The Original Web-Wise-Wizard
Web Authors, Web Developers and Webmasters Internet Toolbox
Best viewed at 1024 x 768 using a colour depth greater than 256

Google Tips and Tricks

 

Google In Context ...

Google has long been established as the most important search portal on the World-Wide-Web. According to our site statistics, Google provides the Web-Wise-Wizard site with more search referrals (hits) than all other search engines and Web directories combined and these statistics correspond other statistics available on the Web. It is certanily worth noting the increasing market share of Yahoo! Search and MSN Search but their core problem is that in the minds of many users, Google has become to Web search what Hoover became to vacuum cleaners. The two terms are becoming synonymous.

Who Links To Your Site ...

or more importantly, who links to your competitor sites? ...

One of the most useful pieces of information you can posess when you are promoting your Website is which pages in the Google index, have links pointing to a given site and in particular, to each of it's individual pages. It is beyond the scope of this tutorial to discuss in depth, why this information is invaluable but one example could be to count the number of sites there are in the Google index that contain links to your site. Another even more useful example would be to find out who really links to your more successfull competitor sites, those sites that get thousands of Google referrals. Armed with this information you could run a very sucessful targeted link exchange campaign to get many of these sites linking to your site.

 Main URL of target site ( e.g. http://www.some-site.com/ )

Search Google For Your Link ...

This is a most important piece of information. You have exchanged links with a Website and you know that their link to you has been posted on their site because you have checked it manually by loading the page into your browser. However, to be of real value to your site the page with your link on it needs to have been indexed by Google and be in the Google index. Use this test to check the Google index to see if a page exists in their index for a particular Domain that contains a link to your site. Although some sites manage to get their links indexed by Google in a very short space of time it can take several weeks for other sites to get their pages indexed. Other sites do not get their links pages indexed at all and this utility will help you to identify these sites.

 Main URL of target site ( e.g. http://www.their-site.com/ )
 Exact string to search for ( e.g. your-site.com )
 
 
 

Google Operators ...

Google advanced operators are a way of modifing or expanding Google's search capabilities using the normal SERP (search engine results page) search query input. They can be divided into 2 categories, alternate query types and query modifiers.

Alternate Query Types

cache: If you include other words in the query, Google will highlight those words within the cached document. For instance, [cache:www.google.com web] will show the cached content with the word "web" highlighted.

link: The query [link:] will list webpages that have links to the specified webpage. For instance, [link:www.google.com] will list webpages that have links pointing to the Google homepage. Note there can be no space between the "link:" and the web page url.

related: The query [related:] will list web pages that are "similar" to a specified web page. For instance, [related:www.google.com] will list web pages that are similar to the Google homepage. Note there can be no space between the "related:" and the web page url.

info: The query [info:] will present some information that Google has about that web page. For instance, [info:www.google.com] will show information about the Google homepage. Note there can be no space between the "info:" and the web page url.

Query Modifiers

site: If you include [site:] in your query, Google will restrict the results to those websites in the given domain. For instance, [help site:www.google.com] will find pages about help within www.google.com. [help site:com] will find pages about help within .com urls. Note there can be no space between the "site:" and the domain.

allintitle: If you start a query with [allintitle:], Google will restrict the results to those with all of the query words in the title. For instance, [allintitle: google search] will return only documents that have both "google" and "search" in the title.

intitle: If you include [intitle:] in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containing that word in the title. For instance, [intitle:google search] will return documents that mention the word "google" in their title, and mention the word "search" anywhere in the document (title or no). Note there can be no space between the "intitle:" and the following word.

Putting [intitle:] in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting [allintitle:] at the front of your query: [intitle:google intitle:search] is the same as [allintitle: google search].

allinurl: If you start a query with [allinurl:], Google will restrict the results to those with all of the query words in the url. For instance, [allinurl: google search] will return only documents that have both "google" and "search" in the url.

Note that [allinurl:] works on words, not url components. In particular, it ignores punctuation. Thus, [allinurl: foo/bar] will restrict the results to page with the words "foo" and "bar" in the url, but won't require that they be separated by a slash within that url, that they be adjacent, or that they be in that particular word order. There is currently no way to enforce these constraints.

inurl: If you include [inurl:] in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containing that word in the url. For instance, [inurl:google search] will return documents that mention the word "google" in their url, and mention the word "search" anywhere in the document (url or no). Note there can be no space between the "inurl:" and the following word.

Putting "inurl:" in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting "allinurl:" at the front of your query: [inurl:google inurl:search] is the same as [allinurl: google search].

Source: Googles Advanced Operators Page
Featured Tutorial
Want More Traffic? Increase your Link Popularity and your PageRank by learning how to use Web Directories
Wise-Guy Directory
Link To Us Scripts
New Dynamic Link Generator
 
If you find this page interesting or useful then others are likely to view it in exactly the same way. Providing a link to the page will be considered by the search engines as casting a vote for the page. In turn, this will help to improve the search engine ranking of the page resulting in more people being able to see the page. Your link really does count so please don't delay.
 
Post your link NOW!
 
 
Google Tips/Tricks Websites
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Copyright © 1998,2014, Gilbert Hadley, Liverpool, England